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Windows NT reload

By roc30r ·
I have a server which is currently not recognizing a 3 2GB SCSI drives. I took over this project from someone who left the company and as such, I have no idea what the SCSI settings are. The computer is an HP NETSERVER LCII. Any help would be appreciated!!!! (As you can see by the points).

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Windows NT reload

by Tony Hogan In reply to Windows NT reload

Is is seen by the SCSI controller? If not, you've either got a dead drive, a termination or a jumper problem [I've had this many times where a user just installs a new drive as it shipped (which is usually SCSI ID 0) and it conflicts with another drive. It it's seen at the SCSI BIOS level, you should be able to see the drive. You may also be getting a false positive here - NT loads sometimes fail to see the drive simply because the default SCSI drivers are loaded. If the SCSI adapter is not supported, you will not be able to see the adapter nor anything that's attached to it.
To load the specific driver for the adapter during NT setup, do the following:
1. Start Windows NT Setup. During Setup, a message appears stating "Setup has recognized the following mass storage devices in your computer."
2. When you are prompted, press S to skip detection, then press S again to display a list of supported SCSI host adapters.
3. Click Other at the bottom of the list.
4. Insert the Drivers Disk [for your particu

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Windows NT reload

by roc30r In reply to Windows NT reload

The question was auto-closed by TechRepublic

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Windows NT reload

by Hasse MCSE/Brainbench In reply to Windows NT reload

Hi!
The easiest way to fix this in my opinion is to just remove the new drive.
Boot the machine and when prompted go into the SCSI BIOS, check which IDs are free.
Set the new drive too one of the free IDs and reinsert it into the server.
Startupthe server again and when prompted go into the SCSI BIOS and check if the drive shows up on the ID you assigned it too.

If it dosen't I'd guess the drive is bad as said before.

PS! Below some info on how to set/check SCSI IDs on a drive.

When it comes to assigning SCSI IDs it works like this.
Find the jumpers where you set the id, often shown on a label ontop of the drive where they are.
Jumper 1 = 1
Jumper 2 = 2
Jumper 3 = 4
Jumper 4 = 8
So if no jumpers are set the drive get ID= 0
If jumpers 2 and 4 are set you get ID = 10
You just add 1+2+4+8 = 15, depending on which jumpers are set.

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Windows NT reload

by roc30r In reply to Windows NT reload

The question was auto-closed by TechRepublic

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by gage In reply to Windows NT reload

Answer #2 is pointing in the right direction. To add to that the SCSI ID# for the three drives is factory set to the same ID number so the SCSI controller sees one ID# repeated three times what is the controller to do. Since each SCSI device in the chain needs a different ID#, find out who manufactured the drives and how to change their SCSI ID#.

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Windows NT reload

by roc30r In reply to Windows NT reload

The question was auto-closed by TechRepublic

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by roc30r In reply to Windows NT reload

This question was auto closed due to inactivity

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