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Windows XP versus Windows 2000

By Swag ·
I have a small network composed of a NT Exchange Server and Windows 2000 file server, with 18 workstaions running W95 and W2000. Going forward with the worksation upgrade are there any recommendations between XP and 2000 as the operating system or any issues to be concerned about?

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Windows XP versus Windows 2000

by TimTheToolMan In reply to Windows XP versus Windows ...

Hi,

Well, I've been on this list for a while now and I've not seen any posts that would be show stoppers for you.

My own experience of XP on the desktop is that its more stable and better integrated than 2000. But I must admit, I'm only running a 2000 server and not an Exchange server as well. Still, I dont remember seeing many if any posts where XP has been the culprit for an Exchange problem.

I would recommend you do a thorough check on whether the hardware you have will be compatible with XP as some of the older hardware's drivers weren't rewritten for XP and while the Microsoft supplied drivers will usually work, you may lose some functionality.

XP is more resource hungry too. Check your hardware vs the minimum requirements- especially for memory.

Cheers,
Tim.

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Windows XP versus Windows 2000

by Swag In reply to Windows XP versus Windows ...

The question was auto-closed by TechRepublic

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Windows XP versus Windows 2000

by timwalsh In reply to Windows XP versus Windows ...

Besides the slightly better stability of XP over 2000, the only issues in my mind (as an Admin) for recommending XP over 2000 are the Remote Desktop and Remote Assitance features. Remote Desktop is an extension of the Terminal Services Remote Administration mode as included in Win2K Server. Clients for Remote Desktop can be installed on any computer running Windows (later than Win95). Functionality is exactly the same as Terminal Services. The only requirements are this this option be enabled on the desktop and the computer to be accessed be turned on.

Remote Assistance works slightly differently in that a user running XP can contact another user running XP and allow the other user to take control if his system for help purposes.If neither of these services is of importance to you, since you already are running Win2K on some of your workstations, you may want to consider just upgrading to Win2K so save a little money and maintain some consistency.

You and your Win95 users will both be happier with the stability of either of these operating systems. However, be prepared for the user learning curve as most things that Win95 users are familiar with either don't exist in Win2K or XP, or exist in a different form or location.

Issues regarding the actual upgrade:
If you choose to upgrade all your systems to XP, you should have no issues win the systems running Win2K as the hardware requirements are almost identical. Also most (but not all) software (to include drivers) that is Win2K friendly will also work with XP.

The Win95 workstations may be another matter. If these computers were originally loaded with Win95, chances are that they will not meet minimum WinXP hardware requirements (although it may just be a simple matter of adding memory). Win95 drivers definitely won't work with XP. If hardware is old, drivers may not be available for XP.
(continued)

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Windows XP versus Windows 2000

by timwalsh In reply to Windows XP versus Windows ...

Besides the slightly better stability of XP over 2000, the only issues in my mind (as an Admin) for recommending XP over 2000 are the Remote Desktop and Remote Assitance features. Remote Desktop is an extension of the Terminal Services Remote Administration mode as included in Win2K Server. Clients for Remote Desktop can be installed on any computer running Windows (later than Win95). Functionality is exactly the same as Terminal Services. The only requirements are this this option be enabled on the desktop and the computer to be accessed be turned on.

Remote Assistance works slightly differently in that a user running XP can contact another user running XP and allow the other user to take control if his system for help purposes.If neither of these services is of importance to you, since you already are running Win2K on some of your workstations, you may want to consider just upgrading to Win2K so save a little money and maintain some consistency.

You and your Win95 users will both be happier with the stability of either of these operating systems. However, be prepared for the user learning curve as most things that Win95 users are familiar with either don't exist in Win2K or XP, or exist in a different form or location.

Issues regarding the actual upgrade:
If you choose to upgrade all your systems to XP, you should have no issues win the systems running Win2K as the hardware requirements are almost identical. Also most (but not all) software (to include drivers) that is Win2K friendly will also work with XP.

The Win95 workstations may be another matter. If these computers were originally loaded with Win95, chances are that they will not meet minimum WinXP hardware requirements (although it may just be a simple matter of adding memory). Win95 drivers definitely won't work with XP. If hardware is old, drivers may not be available for XP.

Good Luck.

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Windows XP versus Windows 2000

by Swag In reply to Windows XP versus Windows ...

The question was auto-closed by TechRepublic

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Windows XP versus Windows 2000

by Swag In reply to Windows XP versus Windows ...

This question was auto closed due to inactivity

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