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Wireless design

By rsarvis ·
I have a c-lab in which I have very few cat-5 drops left and need to put in more computers. I am thinking wireless for six of the computers. My lab area distance is 30 to 50 feet max. The computers are Gateway 1.8ghz, 256ram. I am looking at theD-link air DWL-520 wireless PCI adapters w/DWL-1000AP wireless access point 802.11B. I maintain a lab in a city municipal library and cost is always a concideration. Is this a viable way to go or is there other options that would be good or better.

The other option I had thought about is a hub with NAT abilities. Thanks in advance, Randy

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Wireless design

by timwalsh In reply to Wireless design

Wireless is definitely an alternative especially if you need to place computers in places where you can't run cable for safety or aestethic reasons. Two issues to consider:
1. Troubleshooting - Tracing down a connectivity problem with wireless connections can be more time consuming because you need to take new environmental issues into account (electrical noise, electrical interference, signal interference, etc.), that usually weren't a factor with a wired connection..
2. Security - With awired solution, the 2 routes into your network are a physical connection and hack-in over the Internet. With a wireless solution, these same 2 methods still exist but a third is now added. Hackers can "drive-by" with a portable scanner connected to a laptop and discover wireless networks and their vulnerabilities.

The hub is also another reasonable alternative (and probably cheaper depending on the number of computers you are adding). BTW, hubs don't come with NAT capabilities, routers do. You don't need NAT unless you don't have any means of getting more IP addresses for your new computers (You may already be using NAT from your server/ router. How are your present computers getting their IP addresses? Are they fixed - assigned byyour ISP, or dynamically-assigned via DHCP by your ISP or internal DHCP?).

Assuming you can clump together the new computers within a reasonable distance from a drop, going the hub route will definitely be cheaper unless the presence of the hub and patch cords presents safety and/or aesthetic issues.

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Wireless design

by Shanghai Sam In reply to Wireless design

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by smmurphy In reply to Wireless design

Randy,
I have to support Tim's recomendation of adding the hub to your existing network. You stated that cost is an issue, and as he stated, unless there are safety or asthetics concerns, the hub will be a cheaper solution without dramatically increasing support and trouble shooting.

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by Shanghai Sam In reply to Wireless design

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by rsarvis In reply to Wireless design

Thank you all for replying to my question. I will take your suggestion and apply them to my cituation. Thanks again for the help, Randy

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by Shanghai Sam In reply to Wireless design

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by rsarvis In reply to Wireless design

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