Question

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XP Home SP2 and 2003 Server SP2 networking issue

By Shippers ·
Overview
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Newly built network. No connectivity between my 2003 SP2 server and XP Home SP2 workstations on the LAN.

Further details
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1) Workgroup network.
2) Ping requests between the XP machines and the 2003 server fail with "request timed out" to hostnames and IP addresses.
3) Ping requests between the XP machines are successful to hostnames and IP addresses.
4) The browse list in the workgroup is not being populated. i.e. on the 2003 server, when I select Workgroup" in network neighborhood, only itself is listed.
5) Web browsing is successful from all machines via the ADSL router.
6) My ISPs DNS server IP addresses have been configured on the router.
7) The router is serving as a DHCP server and is successfully dishing out IP addresses from 192.168.1.33 upwards.
NAT is enabled on the router.
9) For testing purposes, firewalls have been completely disabled on the router, the 2003 server and the XP machines to no avail.

My technical knowledge is OK, but not great. This one has baffled me for a while now!

Any help greatly appreciated!

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All Answers

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You could try this..

Download "LLTP" from Microsoft on to the XP machine. Or you might have a typo (error) in the "Workgroup" name it could be "WORKGROUP".
Have recheck with all of your settings including the settings in the router. You might be missing a number in the "IP" address range.
Hope all goes well.

Please post back if you have more problems or questions.

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No success yet...

by Shippers In reply to You could try this..

First of all, thank you for your suggestions.

LLTP is something I had tried, but with no success - unless there is more I have to do in addition to simply installing it on the XP machines. All references on the web do seem to be relative to Vista (not 2003 server) when it comes to installing LLTP on XP machines.

However, I do think we are getting close looking this area. The reason is this:

The LAN was working fine prior to installing SP2 + latest OS patches onto the 2003 server. An important point I missed in my original posting.

It is almost as if the 2003 server has beome "locked down" in some way as it might do if it were a Vista machine and set to "public" (i.e. file and print sharing is a no no):

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb727037.aspx

Still stumped here...

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By any chance do you have a..

Server connection disk, why i say this is because with my server software i have one. If you put the server connection disk in the XP machine and just follow the on screen instructions. If not then try this:

How To Set Up Internet Connection Sharing in Windows Server 2003

SUMMARY
How to Install a Second Ethernet Network Adapter to the ICS Host Computer
How to Configure the ICS Host Computer
How to Configure the Windows Client
ICS and Dial-up Networking
Troubleshooting
SUMMARY
Internet Connection Sharing (ICS) permits you to use Windows Server 2003 to connect a small office network or home network over the Internet. ICS provides Network Address Translation (NAT), IP addressing, and name resolution services for all the computers on a small network. This step-by-step article describes how to install ICS on a Windows Server 2003-based computer.

The following hardware or software is required for this procedure:
? A digital subscriber line (DSL) or cable modem connected to an Internet service provider (ISP) and an activated DSL or cable account.
? Two installed network adapters. This article describes how to install a second network adapter.
? A network already configured with functioning TCP/IP.
CAUTION: Before proceeding with the procedures in this article, note the following points:
? Do not use ICS on a network that:

? Uses static IP addresses
? Has a Windows Server 2003 domain controller
? Uses other DNS servers, gateways, or DHCP servers

Because ICS creates a static IP address for your network adapter and allocates IP addresses to other computers on your network, you will lose your connection to the rest of the network if other network computers already provide those services. If one or more of these conditions exist in your network, you must use Windows Server 2003 NAT instead of ICS. For more information about NAT, see Windows Server 2003 Help.
? Do not create a virtual private network (VPN) connection to a corporate network from the ICS computer. If you do, by default all traffic from the ICS computer, including traffic from local area network clients, will be forwarded over the VPN connection to the corporate network. This means that Internet resources will no longer be reachable, and all the client computers will be sending data over the logical connection created with the credentials of the ICS computer user.
? Do not configure ICS on a computer that is a VPN server. If your Windows Server 2003-based computer is serving as a VPN server, you must use Windows Server 2003 NAT.

How to Install a Second Ethernet Network Adapter to the ICS Host Computer
To install another Ethernet adapter to the ICS host computer, you must log on as a member of the Administrators group.
1. Shut down your computer properly, and then physically add the network adapter.
2. Restart your computer.
3. When the Found New Hardware dialog box is displayed that lists the name of the network adapter that you installed, click Next.
4. Click Next on the Install Hardware Device Drivers page.
5. On the Locate Driver Files page, click the media option that contains the drivers for the network adapter that you are installing. For example, click CD-ROM drive, Floppy drive or Hard Drive Directory.
6. On the Driver Files Search Results page, click Finish.

NOTE: When you click Finish, the installation of the network adapter that you just installed is completed.

How to Configure the ICS Host Computer
The ICS host computer provides a connection through the second network adapter to the existing TCP/IP network. Log on as member of the Administrators group to set up the ICS host computer.
1. Click Start, click Control Panel, and then click Network Connections.
2. Right-click Local Area Connection (the network card that you just installed), and then rename it The Internet Connection.

In the Network and Dial-up Connections dialog box, two connections are displayed (for different network adapters): The Internet Connection and Local Area Connection.
3. Right-click The Internet Connection, and then click Properties.
4. Click the General tab, and then verify that Client for Microsoft Networks and Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) are displayed.
5. Click the Advanced tab, and then click to select the Enable Internet Connection Sharing for this Connection check box.

NOTE: Make sure that firewall software or other Internet sharing software from any third-party manufacturer have been removed.
6. Click OK, and then return to the desktop.

How to Configure the Windows Client
NOTE: Because there are several versions of Microsoft Windows, the following steps may be different on your computer. If they are, see your product documentation to complete these steps.

Log on as a member of the Administrators group to set up the Windows clients that will share the Internet connection.
1. Click Start, click Control Panel, and then double-click Network Connections.
2. Right-click Local Area Connection, and then click Properties.
3. Click the General tab, and then verify that Client for Microsoft Networks and Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) are displayed and selected.
4. Click Internet Protocol (TCP/IP), and then click Properties.
5. Click the General tab, click Obtain an IP address automatically, and then click Obtain DNS server address automatically (if these options are not already selected).
6. Click Advanced, and then make sure that the various lists on the IP Settings, DNS, and WINS tabs are all empty.

Note that ICS provides these settings.
7. Click OK, and then return to the desktop.

ICS and Dial-up Networking
You can use Dial-up Networking to connect to the Internet. However, Dial-up Networking typically has a lower bandwidth connection. This connection is not as useful when multiple computers share the connection. Additionally, Dial-up Networking is not persistent (you have to manually dial up to make a connection) and can cause initial delays when you connect to hosts on the Internet.

Troubleshooting
Note the following items to prevent issues from occurring when you configure ICS:
? Do not connect a hub directly to your DSL or cable modem. If you do so, your internal network is vulnerable to other computers located on the Internet. If you do connect a computer directly to a DSL or cable modem, make sure that you turn off file and printer sharing to limit your vulnerability from the Internet. However, when you do so, your network is prevented from sharing files and printers, which may be your primary reason for networking in the first place.
? Verify that firewall software or other Internet sharing software from third-party manufacturers has been removed. Make sure that only the ICS-enabled computer is providing IP addresses, forwarding DNS names, or acting as a default gateway. If not, ICS may not work or you may experience unexpected behavior.
? You cannot modify the configuration of ICS. For example, you cannot prevent ICS from allocating IP addresses or modify the IP addresses that ICS has allocated. If these features are required, you must run NAT instead.
? The ICS computer automatically assigns IP addresses, forwards DNS names to the Internet for name resolution, and assigns itself as the default gateway for connections to the Internet. If the ICS-enabled computer is unavailable, the other client computers on your network cannot access the Internet.
? When you configure your network to use TCP/IP, remove instances of the NetBEUI protocol when you find them. NetBEUI is redundant and may slow down the network.


APPLIES TO
? Microsoft Windows Server 2003, Datacenter Edition (32-bit x86)
? Microsoft Windows Server 2003, Enterprise Edition (32-bit x86)
? Microsoft Windows Server 2003, Standard Edition (32-bit x86)
? Microsoft Windows Server 2003, Web Edition
? Microsoft Windows Server 2003, 64-Bit Datacenter Edition
? Microsoft Windows Server 2003, Enterprise x64 Edition

Hope this helps you in the right direction.

Please post back if you have more problems or questions.

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Also make sure..

That "terminal services" are running, when the terminal page opens go into "favorites" and select any of the web sites on there.

Please post back if you have more problems or questions.

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Networking information for IT Pros

by Jacky Howe In reply to XP Home SP2 and 2003 Serv ...

http://windowshelp.microsoft.com/Windows/en-US/Help/a8eb33c9-c9cc-442f-a73b-c29730c7f8e21033.mspx

http://technet2.microsoft.com/windowsserver/en/library/30722e6f-ac62-44b4-839a-30e985b10d761033.mspx?mfr=true

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Might be a faulty router...

by Shippers In reply to XP Home SP2 and 2003 Serv ...

Looks like the issue is with the router. After a bit more investigation, there is connectivity between the following:

LAN and WAN
WLAN and WAN

but not between:

LAN and WLAN

My suspicion is the router is actually faulty as opposed to misconfigured, as I have been through all the config screens and have read the relevant bits of the manual and have also done a factory reset without success.

The "The LAN was working fine prior to installing SP2 + latest OS patches onto the 2003 server." statement I made in my last post has been proven to be a "red herring" as removing SP2 and patches made no difference.

I will try a new router tomorrow...

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Before you do

by Jacky Howe In reply to Might be a faulty router. ...

Have you considered setting up the file server to take charge of DHCP, DNS, WINS and using the router as the Gateway.
You will not be able to connect XPHome to the Domain but you will be able to access shares and the internet.

Step-by-Step Guide to a Common Infrastructure for Windows Server 2003 Deployment

http://www.microsoft.com/technet/prodtechnol/windowsserver2003/technologies/directory/activedirectory/stepbystep/domcntrl.mspx

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I have decided on this...

by Shippers In reply to Before you do

Yes, I have considered having the file server take charge of DHCP, DNS and WINS. However, as it turns out, the difficulties that I was experiencing was due to a faulty router.

I am reluctant to promote the server to a domain controller, as the network is only a small one and the workstations are XP home that cannot authenticate with a DC anyway. The new router is now handling DHCP nicely, and the DNS IP addresses as provided by my ISP seem to be doing what's required of them.

The 2003 server has had WINs installed now, and network name resolution is working well.

All seems good now.

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Success!

by Shippers In reply to XP Home SP2 and 2003 Serv ...

The router was the issue. It has been replaced and now the network is functioning exactly as it should.

The old router is now in the back yard, has had petrol poured over it and is on fire! (joking)

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