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XP in a corp. environment, good or bad?

By techrific ·
Howdy all, Thx for any help!

I am considering migrating to XP in our corporate environment.

For my limited knowledge, Win2k has proven itself and is a known entity. As for XP I have heard nothing from anyone running an XP environment.


Does anyone have any experience or comments, or can anyone point me to some good studies of XP in a corp environment? (not from Microsoft of course) Thx to any who can help!

Sozo

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by sgt_shultz In reply to XP in a corp. environment ...

i think xp pro is ready for corporate but i wouldn't change from win2k except for maybe my machine so i could get familiar with it. not enuf advantages. are you having trouble with win2k?

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by techrific In reply to

Sorry, I didnt specify the current situation, I didnt want to "direct" the conversation, but rather leave it open to any facet, but here is the goods.
I have taken up a new position in an environment with zero standardization.
One of my first tasks is to remedy that.
I am going to standardize the hardware and software.
I have developed several images before in other positions with win2k.
I am willing to try XP this time around if there are benefits.
XP has some ease of use that some of our new clients may appreciate (we are expanding)
My location is going to serve as the enterprise's prototype and showcase.
So, the question of wheter to use 2k or XP is up for grabs.
What do you guys think?

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by Curacao_Dejavu In reply to XP in a corp. environment ...

xpsp1 is pretty stable, however if your w2k is running why migrate to xp if you don't need the feature.Also there is the licensing issue to consider.
We are still running nt over here.:)
so now real life experience from me, or maybe the lesson is: don't fix something (nt network) if it's running.

I just read a TR artickle over here about reasons to migrate to windows 3000, in the end he suggested linux.

We are actually running on citrix so our clients don't need to upgrade only the servers. and the clients can be from dos, windows, linux, web, mac , and more (in case if I forgot some.)

Leopold

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by techrific In reply to

Sorry, I didnt specify the current situation, I didnt want to "direct" the conversation, but rather leave it open to any facet, but here is the goods.
I have taken up a new position in an environment with zero standardization.
One of my first tasks is to remedy that.
I am going to standardize the hardware and software.
I have developed several images before in other positions with win2k.
I am willing to try XP this time around if there are benefits.
XP has some ease of use that some of our new clients may appreciate (we are expanding)
My location is going to serve as the enterprise's prototype and showcase.
So, the question of wheter to use 2k or XP is up for grabs.
What do you guys think?

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by timwalsh In reply to XP in a corp. environment ...

Much really depends on what you are currently running on your desktops.

If you are currently running Win2K, there is no real compelling reason to upgrade to WinXP unless you want/need some of the additional functionality. This additional functionality (from my perspective) mainly consists of additional GPO settings only available in XP, and additional applications such as Remote Desktop and Remote Assistance.

There are a couple of things to remember here:
1. Microsoft Support options (other than online resources - Knowledge Base, etc.) for ALL Windows client OSes prior to Win2K have expired.
2. Support for Win2K will obviously expire before support for XP.
3. Some software is very finicky about running on XP. Old software that will run on Win2K won't necessarily run on WinXP. If you are primarily running recent mainstream business applications, you probably won't have any problems. If you are running any proprietary, or old legacy applications, check with the vendor.
5. The same thing applies to hardware. Older peripherals may or may not have XP drivers available. If you have any IMPORTANT pieces of older hardware, check with the vendor for XP drivers. In some cases, XP drivers may not be available, but existing Win2K drivers will work. Check first BEFORE making your upgrade decisions.

Hope this helps.

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by compgirlfhredi In reply to XP in a corp. environment ...

Just my thoughts on why I switched. WinXP Pro has distinct advantages .Three main XP feature sets I think make XP pro stand out:
? Usability
? Security
? Troubleshooting
Usability features
Extensive support for wireless networks
Network bridging
Fast user switching
Remote Desktop
File and Settings Transfer wizard (or User Migration Tool

Security features
Encrypt offline files
Internet Connection Firewall (ICF)
Internet Discovery & Control

Troubleshooting features
Remote Assistance
Password reset disk and password hints
Driver Roll Back
System Restore
Automated System Recovery (ASR)
Safe editing of Boot.ini
Single registry editor
Program Compatibility Wizard
Faster execution of Chkdsk
Chkdsk.exe in Windows XP supports new switches (/i and /c) that provide faster performance by skipping certain system files.
Disk Cleanup new options

Final analysis
WinXP Pro's usability, security, and troubleshooting enhancements can provide added value.

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by TheChas In reply to XP in a corp. environment ...

I would seriously consider going with XP Pro for any new systems.

You can disable most of the features that allow users to run games. This will make XP nearly as stable as W2K.

Part of my logic, is that at a minimum, you will get at least 1 more year of support from Microsoft for XP systems than you will for W2K systems.

Things to watch out for:

Windows messaging. This is enabled by default on XP, and can be a major security hole.

Printers and scanners: Make sure that you can get a XP driver from the printer or scanner mfg.
The XP default drivers often do not support all functions for printers and scanners.

JAVA If you need JAVA, I suggest that you get it from Sun instead of dealing with the issues of support and security for Microsoft's version.

Chas

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