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Your thoughts on PMP

By ITJUNKIE ·
Just wondering what everyone thinks. What benefits have you guys seen from carrying the PMP certification?

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In the eye of the beholder

by amcol In reply to Your thoughts on PMP

There are two perspectives on certs, PMP and all the others.

Perspective one: yours. Why are you getting it? Is it to put a bunch of letters after your name? To gain knowledge? To establish credibility due to the possession of the credential? To make yourself more marketable?

I have my own answers to all these questions, you need to formulate your own. In my case I have all the requisite knowledge and experience in spades but never bothered taking the PMP test, preferring to have the confidence that I could represent my value to any organization by virtue of my background and ability to understand the organization's tactical and strategic requirements.

Perspective two: employers, current and prospective. Can a PMP make you a more compelling candidate than someone who doesn't have it? Do you work for, or aspire to work for, an organization that requires it? Do you have the opportunity to achieve an alternative designation (i.e., Six Sigma Master Black Belt)?

Conclusion: PMP is not a bad idea, but neither is it a ticket to ride. As an employer, I'd have to say that given the choice between two equal candidates I'd give the one with the PMP more consideration, but that's only because I'm very familiar with PMI and their programs. If you can demonstrate to me you have intimate knowledge of the PMBOK and have the experience and chops to go along with that, you're hired...with or without the PMP.

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Your thoughts on PMP

by mtesfaye In reply to Your thoughts on PMP

well, With the experiance it is the best certification to have...I cusine getting hired by the local governmnet here in Maryland with 6 figures salary..and it was a decision factor for the management. If you are into project management, that will put you one step ahead.

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Your thoughts on PMP

by mtesfaye In reply to Your thoughts on PMP

well, With the experiance it is the best certification to have...My cusine getting hired by the local governmnet here in Maryland with 6 figures salary..and it was a decision factor for the management. If you are into project management, that will put you one step ahead.

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PMP certification

by pmpcertification In reply to Your thoughts on PMP

So, lots of people are still stuck in weighting what the PMP certification has to offer them, career wise. As I look at current Project Management opportunities in Europe, India and the USA, there is a growing demand for PMP certification. Despite my 4+ years of experience as an Engineering lead with a Master's Degree in Engineering, I felt the need to "qualify" myself to keep my marketability levels fairly high.

PMP certification is definitely a way to go. The requirements are extensive and the test is fairly expensive. But, as I look through the job opportunities, I think, I have made the right decision in investing efforts towards this certification. Since the recruiters and business owners have most probably heard of the PMP, the edge is definitely there. By all means, go for it, but don't expect it to open up a whole lot of opportunities for you.

I have found that the PMP, like most initials after one's name, does not in itself "get you a job". Instead, it just opens more doors or keeps them from being closed when you are competing for those jobs in the market. Usually the initial screening is done by HR people, who don't know much about the position in question - they just go by the "nice to have" requirements as indicated in the job bulletin. If you make it past the HR screening, then it's up to you to earn that job.

PMP is definitely a "generalized" course, but it makes you extremely resourceful when facing a client. A client does have a requirement of PMP, but a matured professional is always better than a fresher. There are certain advantages to being PMP certifies:
1. It recognizes your expertise in project management
2. Doors, which are closed may now open up for you
3. You educate yourself on an extensive toolbox of PMI methodologies, which you could professionally apply in your day-to-day job and projects
4. Its a sign of achievement and you can motivate yourself from your skills and knowledge
5. Networking chances are greater
6. Better salary.

PMPs typically have attractive salaries, which are 10-20% more than the uncertified counterparts

The PMI Certification Department is the first professional certification program of its kind in the world to receive the ISO 9001 certification, a globally recognized mark of a quality management system. PMP gives prospective sponsors and stakeholders the confidence of knowing that their project will be handled by a "professional" who has gone the "extra mile" in getting certified, which demands a lot of dedication and hard work.

Visit http://www.pmtrainingonline.com/ to know more about PMP Certification and it's value.

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PMP certification

by pmpcertification In reply to Your thoughts on PMP

So, lots of people are still stuck in weighting what the PMP certification has to offer them, career wise. As I look at current Project Management opportunities in Europe, India and the USA, there is a growing demand for PMP certification. Despite my 4+ years of experience as an Engineering lead with a Master's Degree in Engineering, I felt the need to "qualify" myself to keep my marketability levels fairly high.

PMP certification is definitely a way to go. The requirements are extensive and the test is fairly expensive. But, as I look through the job opportunities, I think, I have made the right decision in investing efforts towards this certification. Since the recruiters and business owners have most probably heard of the PMP, the edge is definitely there. By all means, go for it, but don't expect it to open up a whole lot of opportunities for you.

I have found that the PMP, like most initials after one's name, does not in itself "get you a job". Instead, it just opens more doors or keeps them from being closed when you are competing for those jobs in the market. Usually the initial screening is done by HR people, who don't know much about the position in question - they just go by the "nice to have" requirements as indicated in the job bulletin. If you make it past the HR screening, then it's up to you to earn that job.

PMP is definitely a "generalized" course, but it makes you extremely resourceful when facing a client. A client does have a requirement of PMP, but a matured professional is always better than a fresher. There are certain advantages to being PMP certifies:
1. It recognizes your expertise in project management
2. Doors, which are closed may now open up for you
3. You educate yourself on an extensive toolbox of PMI methodologies, which you could professionally apply in your day-to-day job and projects
4. Its a sign of achievement and you can motivate yourself from your skills and knowledge
5. Networking chances are greater
6. Better salary.

PMPs typically have attractive salaries, which are 10-20% more than the uncertified counterparts

The PMI Certification Department is the first professional certification program of its kind in the world to receive the ISO 9001 certification, a globally recognized mark of a quality management system. PMP gives prospective sponsors and stakeholders the confidence of knowing that their project will be handled by a "professional" who has gone the "extra mile" in getting certified, which demands a lot of dedication and hard work.

http://www.pmtrainingonline.com/

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