Software

Developers: Want fulfilling work? Here are the 10 most satisfying coding languages

The highest-ranked coding languages may surprise you, according to an ActiveState survey.

Developers choose a programming language for a project based on a number of factors, including what components that project needs, and what languages they are most comfortable with. However, developers are much more satisfied working in some languages than others, according to a Tuesday report from ActiveState.

Adding a new programming language to the workplace was ranked as the largest challenge for developers, with 56% ranking this difficult or very difficult, the report found. This was followed by dependencies (24%), environmental configuration (20%), and reproducible builds (18%).

The pain of adding a new programming language to your company can sometimes interfere with development projects, the report found: 67% of developers surveyed said they have decided against using the best tool for a job because it meant adding a new programming language, and the pain of adding the language would outweigh the benefits.

SEE: Hiring kit: Python developer (Tech Pro Research)

The majority of developers (67%) said they spend part of their time managing dependencies and development tools, compared to 25% who said they spend almost no time doing this, 7% who said most of the time, and 2% who said all the time, the report found.

Here are the 10 programming languages developers are most likely to say they are either satisfied or extremely satisfied with:

  1. Python (68%)
  2. Go (61%)
  3. C# (59%)
  4. SQL (58%)
  5. JavaScript (51%)
  6. C++ (51%)
  7. Kotlin (47%)
  8. Rust (47%)
  9. Swift (47%)
  10. R (47%)

Coming down further on the list were Bash/Shell (45%), Perl (44%), Ruby (40%), Java (39%), Scala (38%), Clojure (37%), Tcl (36%), PHP (37%), Haskell (37%), Visual Basic (33%), Elm (27%), Objective C (26%).

It should be noted that 63% of respondents said Other.

The big takeaways for tech leaders:

  • Python, Go, and C# are the programming languages developers say they are most satisfied with. — ActiveState, 2018
  • 67% of developers said they have decided not to use the best tool for the job because it meant adding a new programming language. — ActiveState, 2018

Also see

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Image: iStockphoto/oatawa

About Alison DeNisco Rayome

Alison DeNisco Rayome is a Staff Writer for TechRepublic. She covers CXO, cybersecurity, and the convergence of tech and the workplace.

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