Samsung SmartThings Find helps you find lost Galaxy devices

Samsung updates SmartThings apps to include new Find feature that lets you find Galaxy phones, tablets, smartwatches and earbuds using Bluetooth.

SmartThings Find is a feature of Samsung's SmartThings app that lets you location Galaxy smartphones, tablets, smartwatches and earbuds. Samsung rolled out SmartThings Find in an update to the SmartThings app (1.7.50-21) on August 22, 2020. SmartThings Find currently works with Galaxy devices running Android 10 or later and will available on Galaxy devices running Android 8 and later starting in September 2020.

How is SmartThings Find different than Samsung Find My Mobile?

Find My Mobile works with Galaxy phones and tablets, like the  Galaxy S20 Note 20 and  Tab S7 . For Find My Mobile to locate a device, it must be connected to a network and can't be turned off. SmartThings Find however, uses Bluetooth to locate lost devices that are near another Samsung device using the SmartThings app. The functionality is similar to the way Apple's Find My app can locate a pair of lost AirPods.

Even if you're not physically close to your lost device or if the device has moved since you misplaced it, SmartThings Find may be able to locate the device or at least give you its last known location. This is because SmartThings Find has community search functionality, similar to that of standalone Bluetooth trackers such as those from Tile and Chipolo. If another Samsung device is in proximity to your lost device, it will appear on SmartThings Find.

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Samsung SmartThings Find lets you located a lost Galaxy phone, tablet, smartwatch or earbuds.

How is SmartThings Find different to other Samsung Find My... features?

Find My Band, Find My Gear, Find My Watch and Find My Earbuds are located within the Galaxy Wearable app and designed specifically for Samsung fitness bands, smartwatches and earbuds. It's not clear if these features will eventually be folded into the SmartThings app, but it seems likely as they seem to provide the same functionality.

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By Bill Detwiler

Bill Detwiler is Editor in Chief of TechRepublic and the host of Cracking Open, CNET and TechRepublic's popular online show. Prior to joining TechRepublic in 2000, Bill was an IT manager, database administrator, and desktop support specialist in the ...