Employees are burnt out and delayed promotions aren't helping

More than three-quarters of remote workers believe their "career development has been negatively affected" in the last 12 months with many citing burnout as a factor, according to a new survey.

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Image: GettyImages/filadendron

Companies around the globe have adopted remote work policies due to COVID-19 with round-the-clock Zoom meetings and virtual whiteboard sessions replacing in-person collaboration for many professionals. On Thursday, cloud software provider, BambooHR, published the results of a study about remote work, employee burnout, perceived financial shortfalls related to promotions that never happened and more.

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Burnout, big bucks and delayed promotions

In the last 12 months, 21% of respondents said they had experienced a "promotion freeze," 30% anticipated a promotion that was either delayed or denied during this time and the average respondent believed they are missing more than $9,800 due to promotions being denied or delayed during this time, according to the press release.

Respondents reported a number of tactics to attempt to land a promotion. This includes working extra hours (56%), volunteering for additional "projects and responsibilities" (50%), taking on the responsibilities of a person who had been laid off or had their hours reduced (40%), per the release. Additional tactics include working on a person's day off (38%) and working "so hard they got burned out" (29%).

More than one-third (36%) of remote professionals "feel as though their career progress has stalled or gone backward" over the last 12 months, per the release, and this echoed sentiments in a 2020 Blind survey that found half of the professionals believe working from home has negatively impacted their careers.

The Great Resignation of 2021

We've previously covered the rumored Great Resignation of 2021 with multiple surveys detailing the number of professionals who plan to land a new job in the months ahead. For example, a separate Blind survey published earlier this year determined that nearly half of employees plan to land a new position in 2021. Overall, more than 40% of workers worldwide are "considering leaving their employer this year," according to a Microsoft Work Trend Index.

SEE: Juggling remote work with kids' education is a mammoth task. Here's how employers can help (free PDF) (TechRepublic)

In the BambooHR survey, 40% of remote professionals who were planning "on switching career paths or looking for a new job in the next six months" said these decisions were due to feeling "stuck in their current job" and 36% pinned this on burnout. Over the last 12 months, more than one-third of respondents said they had taken a day off work "to help them reduce burnout," per the release.

Methodology

The survey was conducted from April 6 through 15 and involved 1,000 full-time remote professionals in the U.S.

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