CXO

Why IT is the most problematic department in your company

Slow response times and broken processes make IT the main reason many people quit their jobs.

Building a slide deck, pitch, or presentation? Here are the big takeaways:
  • 62% of employees say they observe broken IT processes within their organization, making it the most problematic department. — Nintex, 2018
  • Only 24% of employees report very prompt service from in-house IT teams, and only 7% report so for remote IT teams. — Nintex, 2018

IT represents the most broken corporate process in American enterprises, according to a new report from Nintex—leading to the rise of shadow IT and employee dissatisfaction.

The report surveyed 1,000 professionals from firms with more than 1,000 employees, finding that 62% reported that they observe broken IT processes within their company, making it the most problematic department, the report found. Only 24% of employees said they receive "very prompt service" from in-house IT teams, while just 7% said the same for remote IT teams.

These findings highlight the need for IT teams to work on relieving bottlenecks and improving service times.

Frustrated employees often turn to shadow IT, using unsanctioned devices or apps at work and increasing security risks, the report noted. Some 46% of millennial workers surveyed reported doing this as a direct response to delayed IT troubleshooting, and complicated technologies that are difficult for the line of business to manage.

SEE: IT leader's guide to achieving digital transformation (Tech Pro Research)

IT professionals themselves are not setting a good example: 60% of them said they have used unsanctioned apps or devices because of unresolved IT issues, making them the largest culprits of shadow IT, according to the report.

"In many organizations, broken processes are everywhere," Ryan Duguid, Nintex senior vice president of technology strategy, said in a press release. "But, due to IT's countless other priorities, most companies have designated them as unsolvable issues."

Other than technology troubleshooting, employees named access to tools and documents that enable strong job performance, annual performance reviews, promotions, and employee onboarding as top broken processes.

One third of employees surveyed said that they are currently looking for a new job, with 86% of those naming their company's broken processes as a main reason behind this decision.

"Broken processes within American enterprises like trouble contacting IT and inconsistent performance reviews are taking a serious toll on employee morale and increasingly becoming a top concern for C-suite leaders," Nintex CEO John Burton said in the release. Automating some of these processes may be one solution for increasing efficiency, Burton added.

Also see

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Image: iStockphoto/BrianAJackson

About Alison DeNisco Rayome

Alison DeNisco Rayome is a Senior Editor for TechRepublic. She covers CXO, cybersecurity, and the convergence of tech and the workplace.

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