Even if your data is stored in the cloud, you need to back it up

Misconceptions about fault-tolerance of data in the cloud is leading to IT professionals not safely backing up mission-critical business data.

How to Install and Use the Duplicati Cloud Backup Solution Jack Wallen shows you how to install and use the cross-platform, open source, cloud-friendly, incredibly flexible Duplicati backup tool.

When considering any cloud service provider, reading the service-level agreement (SLA) before disaster occurs in deployment is a good strategy. Relying on your cloud service provider to provide fault-tolerant data storage does not account for the potential of data loss through user error, malicious destruction of data, or other incidents that can result in the loss of mission-critical business data.

Of the 1,000 IT professionals surveyed in a data protection study commissioned by Barracuda Networks, 62% of respondents indicated they use Office 365. Of those users, 40% said they do not use any third-party backup software for their Office 365 deployments.

SEE: Electronic data retention policy (Tech Pro Research)

Naturally, as a vendor of backup solutions for Office 365, Barracuda Networks would greatly like to sell more software licenses, though the underlying point being made here has merit independent of the source. The report states:

Deleted emails are not backed up in the traditional sense; they are kept in the Recycle Bin for a maximum of 93 days before they're deleted forever. On SharePoint and OneDrive, deleted information is retained for a maximum of 14 days by Microsoft and individuals must open a support ticket to retrieve it. SharePoint and OneDrive are unable to retrieve single items/files; they must restore an entire instance. It's unlikely that such short retention policies will meet most compliance requirements.

The report also surfaces higher skepticism toward cloud services than is typically seen, with only 23.2% of respondents migrating applications to public cloud platforms, or having already completed their migration. Some 52.4% indicated having no plans to do so. For file services on public cloud platforms, the skepticism was higher, with 15.9% onboard or onboarding, and 59% having no plans to do so.

Respondents reacted with higher enthusiasm toward email services from public cloud providers, with 33.4% already fully migrated and 17.6% currently migrating, totaling 51% adoption. Only 31.8% expressed no plans to migrate email services.

For more on securing your data in the cloud, check out Amazon Web Services launches fully-managed AWS Backup.

Also see

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By James Sanders

James Sanders is a technology writer for TechRepublic. He covers future technology, including quantum computing, AI, and 5G, as well as cloud, security, open source, mobility, and the impact of globalization on the industry, with a focus on Asia.