Why Wearable Translator 2 earbuds are a must-have for travelers

When you need a translator for travel, look no further than the Wearable Translator 2 for on-the-go, near-real-time translation.

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It's very rare that I'm truly blown away by a piece of technology. After all, we've pretty much seen every iteration of the smartphone, the PC/laptop market has yet to reach the next seriously game-changing level, and software has already been containerized and virtualized to scale and beyond.

But recently I was sent the Wearable Translator 2 for review. I scheduled the review on my calendar, thinking little of it. But when it finally came time to open the tool and give it a try, I was, much to my surprise, blown away.

Imagine this: You're on a trip (be it for business or pleasure) to a country where your native tongue is not a second language. You have Google Maps to help you navigate the land, but what about the language barrier? How do you break through? Simple. You pull out your Wearable Translator 2 earbuds, slip the host bud in your ear, and the guest bud into the ear of someone you want to speak with (with permission, of course) and start speaking. As long as you have each bud set to the proper native language of the person wearing it, when each person speaks into their bud, it automatically translates into the language of the person listening with the opposite bud.

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Not only does it work, it works seamlessly. It's as though you were teleported into some Star Trekian future, where such things existed -- only it's now, and it's right  in the palm of your hand (or your ears, if you happen to be wearing them).

Impressive from set up to use

The Wearable Translator 2 (WT2) isn't just impressive in use. It's also remarkable in that it manages to make set up as painless as anything I've ever used. This is made even more impressive in that it requires Bluetooth. And we all know how finicky Bluetooth is.

Upon unboxing the tech, I assumed (given it's lofty goals) it was going to be a real pain to get connected to the phone, as Bluetooth devices are so often a hassle to get working with any level of consistency. However, the WT2 set up went something like this:

  1. Unbox the devices.
  2. Install the WT2 Plus app (available from the Google Play Store and iTunes).
  3. Open the app.
  4. On first run, swipe through the welcome.
  5. Remove each bud from the case and set them next to the phone (Figure A).
  6. OK the permissions necessary for the buds.
  7. Wait for the buds to automatically pair.

That's it. The WT2 is ready to go.

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Figure A: Connecting the buds to the phone.

Using it is simple, too. 

  1. Open the app, tap one of the modes (Simul for simultaneous translation, touch mode for noisier environments, and speaker mode so that the translation will play through the phone). 
  2. After you select your mode, you then select the language for the host and guest (Figure B). 
  3. Start speaking, and whatever you say will be translated into the language chosen for the guest (and will be heard, in near real time, through the guest bud). 

The Simul mode is best for one-on-one discussion or when you're in a quieter environment. With that mode, you simply speak and what you say automatically translates.

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Figure B: Choosing the languages for guest and host.

When I say the WT2 will blow you away, that is no understatement. The translation is accurate, fast, and hands free (in Simul mode). It's almost as if you had your own personal translator at your mercy -- because you do (only the electronic sort).

A must-have for travelers

If you find yourself constantly traveling (for business or pleasure), and the language barrier tends is an issue, you should consider the WT2 a must-have. These little earbuds shatter that barrier, making communication as easy as though both parties spoke the same language. Although the cost might seem prohibitive to some (the device can be purchased on Amazon for $229.98 USD), anyone that needs on-the-go, near-real-time translation would be doing themselves a favor purchasing the Wearable Translator 2.

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