Google's new certificates help people get jobs in analytics, UX, project management without degrees

The search engine giant said it will fund 100,000 need-based scholarships for the IT-focused certificate programs. Learn more about Google's Career Certificates.

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Image: vladans, Getty Images/iStockphoto

Google said its recently launched suite of Google Career Certificates will help Americans get qualifications needed for high-paying, high-growth job fields without a college degree. The search giant said it considers the certificates as the equivalent of a four-year degree for related roles.

The company said it will also fund 100,000 need-based scholarships for the certificate programs.

"College degrees are out of reach for many Americans, and you shouldn't need a college diploma to have economic security. We need new, accessible job-training solutions—from enhanced vocational programs to online education—to help America recover and rebuild," Google said in a blog post.

SEE: IT policies, checklists, toolkits, and research for download (TechRepublic Premium)

Since 2017, Google's Grow with Google initiative has helped 5 million Americans get the skills they need to get a job or grow their business, according to the company. 

Google is also committing $10 million in job training Google.org grants for communities around the country in tandem with partners including the nonprofits YWCA, NPower, and JFF (Jobs for the Future).

Google offers data analytics, project management, and UX design certificates

Three new Google Career Certificates are now available in the high-paying, high-growth career fields of data analytics, project management, and user experience (UX) design, the company said.

"Like our IT Support and Automation in Python certificates, these new career programs are designed and taught by Google employees who work in these fields,'' Google said. "The programs equip participants with the essential skills they need to get a job. No degree or prior experience is required to take the courses."

The company is also expanding its IT Certificate Employer Consortium, which includes more than 50 employers besides Google such as Walmart, Hulu, and Sprint.

There are "hundreds of apprenticeship opportunities at Google for people completing these career certificate programs to provide real on-the-job training,'' the company said.

The Google Career Certificates in career and technical education high schools around the country will begin with the IT Support Certificate this fall. "These certificates build on our established partnership with more than 100 community colleges," Google said.

The $10 million in Google.org grants will go to the YWCA, NPower and JFF to help workforce boards and nonprofits improve their job training programs and increase access to digital skills for women, veterans, and underserved Americans, the company said. Google said it has provided more than $200 million in grants to nonprofits working to promote economic opportunity as part of its Future of Work initiative since 2017.  

The new Google Career Certificates build on Google's existing programs to create pathways into IT Support careers for people without college degrees. Launched in 2018, the Google IT Certificate program has become the most popular certificate on Coursera, and thousands of people have found new jobs and increased their earnings after completing the course, according to Google.

"Take Yves Cooper, who enrolled in the program through our Grow with Google Partner, Merit America, while working as a van driver,'' the blog noted. "Within five days of completing the program, he was offered a role as an IT helpdesk technician at a nonprofit in his hometown of Washington, D.C."

Google said that 58% of IT Certificate learners identify as Black, Latino, female or veteran, all groups that are underrepresented in the tech industry. 

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By Esther Shein

Esther Shein is a longtime freelance writer and editor whose work has appeared in several online and print publications. Previously, she was the editor-in-chief of Datamation, a managing editor at BYTE, and a senior writer at eWeek (formerly PC Week)...