Zoom is introducing this new feature in its bid to banish Zoom bombing

A new button allowing meeting participants to report users is Zoom's latest attempt to bring its security features up to scratch.

5 ways to prevent Zoom bombing

Zoom is introducing a new feature that will let users report meeting participants in a move to deter gatecrashers. The video-conferencing company is introducing a dedicated 'report user to Zoom' button in an upcoming update as it looks to put an end to the troublesome trend of 'Zoom bombing', which has left the company in hot water in recent weeks.

The update will be rolled out on Sunday, 26 April according to release notes on Zoom's support page, which was first spotted by PC Mag.

SEE: Zoom 101: A guidebook for beginners and business pros (TechRepublic Premium)

According to the notes, the feature will allow the host of a meeting to report a user during by clicking on the Security icon, then Report.

"This feature will generate a report that will be sent to the Zoom Trust and Safety team to evaluate any misuse of the platform and block a user if necessary," they said. Zoom has been forced to rapidly shore-up its security features in recent weeks.

The video-conferencing service has exploded in popularity as the ongoing coronavirus pandemic shifted workplaces from offices to the home. According to data from Wandera published in early April, Zoom enjoyed a 101% increase in connections in the week leading up to 16 March, and a 224.7% increase from the month previous.

But it wasn't long before users began to discover weaknesses in the platform's security. Particularly troublesome was the fact that Meeting IDs remained visible, meaning that anyone who had this ID could potentially join the call without needing a password.

This gave rise to the trend of 'Zoom bombing', where uninvited guests crashed Zoom meetings, often after having the ID shared with them on social media, and they then – in some cases – shared offensive material.

At one point, pranksters were even able to gatecrash a House Oversight Committee meeting, much to the chagrin of US officials, who had warned government against using the platform.

Zoom has since taken steps to fix this, introducing passwords and waiting rooms for all Zoom meetings by default, and removing meeting IDs from the top of the Zoom application window.

The latest version of Zoom (4.6.12) will also feature enhanced encryption for the platform's phone client. This a problem area for the company, after it was forced to admit that the service was not secured with true end-to-end encryption as it had suggested.

Zoom CEO Eric Yuan later acknowledged that the company had "moved too fast" in an interview with CNN and said the company would focus on bolstering the privacy and security of its platform.

SEE: Zoom halts feature development to focus on security problems (ZDNet)

Other enhancements coming in the incoming update include changes to how meetings work when the host leaves. Hosts will now be required to assign a new one when leaving and a pop-up message will appear asking if the host wants to leave or end the meeting.

Users will also have the ability to provide additional feedback if the setting 'Post meeting feedback survey' is enabled. This setting was previously named 'Display end of meeting feedback survey'.

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